What are scrappie critters?

Many people ask what scrappie critters are & how they came about, it’s quite simple, they were a creative experiment.

Scrappie critters were born, when a friend asked me to make something for her friends little girl & to have fun with it.

I was getting bored of aprons and other cookie cutter style items I have made over the years too & needed something different. Sure, I create my own patterns for the most part, but it’s still kinda boring, same thing over & over again, especially when I was churning out hundreds of aprons to attend events like Comic-Con trying to guess what might sell, it was soul sucking. Those days taught me a lot, but I still have mountains of aprons to sell (so if you are interested in any well made, fully lined aprons, let me know) 😛

Anyhow, I had been wanting to find I way to make use of many of my random pieces of fabric, that are often too small for bigger projects, whilst also making a statement about how each of us are also uniquely imperfect.

The scrappies have evolved since then. When I initially had to come up with a name for them I called them “scrappy monsters”, but the name didn’t entirely sit well, why call something a monster, when it is supposed to celebrate differences. The word monster is defined as ” an imaginary creature that is typically large, ugly, and frightening” by Oxford & that didn’t capture my idea at all. The use of monster was something that many told me frightened their children too, so after much careful thought, I came up with the idea to call them “scrappie critters”, a much better name that encapsulates the meaning & thought behind them.

My style has evolved over time, too, as I have embraced the idea that there are no rules. Initially, they were made with one open & one shut eye only, then I switched to two eyes (the one closed option, freaked kids out) and now I do a bit of anything, sometimes they have one, sometimes two, three, four, sometimes both eyes are closed, I go with the flow…. Sometimes they have arms, sometimes they only have legs , sometimes they are devoid of any appendages at all, or the appendages are all different sizes.

There are some deliberate design choices made, such as the way I sew them shut. They’re sewn in such a way that it’s not entirely invisible, some people might notice it, but no-one has ever commented, which I have always found curious & awesome. I adore that even an experiment that doesn’t turn out the way I had envisioned, isn’t a failure, they are after all “uniquely imperfect” & it adds to their charm.